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  • July 2, 2010

    Surely Israel has redlines

    Indyk believes that Obama and Netanytahu can get along. Yitzhak Klein believes Barak Is Wrong, Israel Can’t Appease U.S. Meanwhile Abbas: Israel must accept the pre ’67 borders

    But if turns out to be true, Report: Israel to apologize, I’ll explode.

    A quiet diplomacy on the Mideast peace path

    By Martin Indyk, WaPo

    The current sturm und drang in U.S.-Israel relations cloaks a surprising development: President Obama and Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu are beginning to develop a constructive working relationship sensitive to the legitimate concerns of the other.

    Israel’s Bureau of Statistics reported in May, for example, that in the first quarter of 2010 there were zero building starts in the West Bank settlements — a demand Obama had made at the outset of his administration. Since Vice President Biden’s embarrassing visit to Jerusalem in March, Netanyahu has quietly blocked new building tenders in East Jerusalem, demolitions of Palestinian housing and evictions of Palestinian residents there.


    Reciprocating, Obama recently announced an additional $205 million in military assistance to Israel to pay for the deployment of anti-rocket defense systems for Israeli border towns. Last month, Netanyahu praised the Obama administration for securing passage of the latest U.N. Security Council resolution ratcheting up sanctions on Iran’s nuclear program. Indeed, for a year now, the Israeli and American national security establishments have been coordinating closely to thwart Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

    Those who view Israel as a liability and long for a president who will impose peace on Israel will find this unwelcome news. But those who seek a breakthrough in the Middle East peace process and the effective curbing of Iran’s nuclear ambitions — including moderate Arab leaders — should welcome what appears to be a recognition by Obama and Netanyahu that neither can achieve their purposes unless they work with, rather than against, each other.

    The flotilla incident was an important test of this newfound comity. Israel’s bungled interception of the Mavi Marmara put Obama in an awkward position, forcing him to choose between condemning Israel, thereby winning brownie points with the Muslim world, and standing up for an embattled ally’s right to defend itself. Working closely with Netanyahu — they spoke at least three times on the phone during the crisis — Obama forged an approach that prevented a rupture in Turkish-Israeli relations, headed off condemnation in the U.N. Security Council, shaped an investigation palatable to Israel and is easing the Gaza blockade closure in ways that meet the requirements of normal life for Gazans while honoring Israel’s legitimate security concerns.
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    However, Obama’s protection of Israeli equities at a time when the rest of the world is busy remonstrating for Israel’s tragic killing of militant protesters is not cost-free. The president’s outreach to the Muslim world has been forfeited; the only thing that can compensate is serious movement to resolve the Palestinian problem.

    In this regard, Netanyahu’s freezing of housing starts in the West Bank and avoidance of provocative actions in East Jerusalem helps set the stage. The Palestinian Authority’s policing of the West Bank territory under its control to prevent violent attacks on Israelis begins to demonstrate that there is a responsible Palestinian partner. Moreover, the Arab League has formally endorsed Palestinian entry into “proximity talks” with Israel — a mandate that it did not withdraw despite the Gaza crisis.

    Though few seem to have noticed, these factors combine to create the most conducive environment for peace negotiations since the outbreak of the second intifada in 2000.

    Yet in less than four months, unless progress is made on borders and security issues and direct negotiations commence, Netanyahu will come under heavy pressure to unfreeze settlement activity, and the Arab League mandate will be withdrawn. This cannot be in the interests of Netanyahu or Obama as one struggles to overcome international opprobrium and the other seeks a breakthrough on a “vital national security interest.”

    The question remains whether they can overcome the mistrust that had permeated and poisoned their personal relationship and build a partnership for peace. Can Obama convince Netanyahu that he seeks his success as a peacemaker rather than the downfall of his right-wing coalition and that he means it when he says he is “determined to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons”? Can Netanyahu convince Obama that he is serious about achieving the two-state solution rather than playing for time until the American electoral cycle kicks in? In addition, can Netanyahu encourage Obama by doing his part to isolate Iran through entering peace negotiations with Syria and calming things down on Israel’s northern front?

    Two simple human gestures could create an environment for testing these propositions. When Netanyahu comes to Washington next week, Obama should invite him alone to Camp David for an afternoon walk in the woods. For his part, since he models himself on Winston Churchill, Netanyahu needs to make a real effort to take Obama into his confidence, much as Churchill wooed Roosevelt in the run-up to America’s entry into World War II.

    If they can build a common understanding for a path forward, Netanyahu should reciprocate by hosting Obama in Israel, where he can help the president begin the overdue process of rebuilding the Israeli people’s trust in American steadfastness and erode their sense of embattled victimhood.

    As Churchill said, “To jaw-jaw is always better than to war-war.” If Obama and Netanyahu can learn to “jaw-jaw,” perhaps they can also achieve real peace.

    Martin Indyk, vice president for foreign policy at the Brookings Institution, is the author of “Innocent Abroad: An Intimate Account of American Peace Diplomacy in the Middle East.”

  • Posted by Ted Belman @ 4:47 pm | 14 Comments »

    14 Comments to Surely Israel has redlines

    1. yamit82 says:

      Surely Israel has redlines

      Shirley, Israel has no red lines, except maybe the Med!

    2. yamit82 says:

      SHIRLEY! You’re not serious?

    3. Birdalone says:

      Indyk fails to note that Obama’s first change was to return the bronze bust of Winston Churchill on loan to the Oval Office back to the British, while Netanyahu has a portrait of Churchill in HIS office. Bibi better pack his own lunch…

    4. Shebrew Warrior says:

      I saw this guy Indyk on PBS last week. He’s an asswipe. He believes in a reductionist Israel. I believe in an expansionist Israel. What will register with the Arabs is knowing that the longer they wait to accept Israel, the more territory they surrender. Shebrew’s Land For Peace Proposal To The Arab World: Make peace or lose your land. This King of Jordan is also a troublemaker; excuse me, moderate troublemaker. He should be told to pipe down or during the next intifada Israel will herd the Palestinian Arabs back into his country, then we’ll see how mouthy he is. I would think that an apology to Turkey is politically suicidal for BB, unless it goes like this: “Sorry we didn’t kill everybody on that boat.” I cut him loads of slack because he has a tough job, but come on. Apologize for what?

    5. tiripou says:

      Don’t know your e-mail, so I’ll post here…

      Thank you for a wonderful erev Shabbat. You bachelor’s know how to do Shabbos dinner!

    6. Laura says:

      Israel’s bungled interception of the Mavi Marmara put Obama in an awkward position, forcing him to choose between condemning Israel, thereby winning brownie points with the Muslim world, and standing up for an embattled ally’s right to defend itself.

      For anyone with moral clarity, this would be a very easy choice.

    7. Laura says:

      I saw this guy Indyk on PBS last week. He’s an asswipe. He believes in a reductionist Israel. I believe in an expansionist Israel. What will register with the Arabs is knowing that the longer they wait to accept Israel, the more territory they surrender. Shebrew’s Land For Peace Proposal To The Arab World: Make peace or lose your land. This King of Jordan is also a troublemaker; excuse me, moderate troublemaker. He should be told to pipe down or during the next intifada Israel will herd the Palestinian Arabs back into his country, then we’ll see how mouthy he is. I would think that an apology to Turkey is politically suicidal for BB, unless it goes like this: “Sorry we didn’t kill everybody on that boat.” I cut him loads of slack because he has a tough job, but come on. Apologize for what?

      I love Shebrew Warrior’s approach to diplomacy.

    8. RandyTexas says:

      Apologize for what?

      The Turks should apologize; they knew what was going down, and they knew the score from the get. They won’t do it of course. It was a calculated move from the beginning to incite the radical Islamic elements in Turkey for political manipulation.

    9. Ed D says:

      An interesting thought. Turkey’s militaary has been the one entity that demanded a secular government and propelled the friendship oif Israel. How possible is it that their army generals could rebel against the government? The army has always been the controlling factor.

    10. yamit82 says:

      An interesting thought. Turkey’s militaary has been the one entity that demanded a secular government and propelled the friendship oif Israel. How possible is it that their army generals could rebel against the government? The army has always been the controlling factor.

      Not likely most have been jailed.

    11. yamit82 says:

      Don’t know your e-mail, so I’ll post here…

      Thank you for a wonderful erev Shabbat. You bachelor’s know how to do Shabbos dinner!

      Interesting choice of avatar

      I’m a bachelor and you should have seen what I ate. Heinz Baked Beans right out of the can. So you don’t mean me.

    12. Bill Narvey says:

      Indyk is as naive as he is doubtlessly brilliant.

      One can only smirk at Indyk suggesting that Obama fashions himself after Churchill. One of Obama’s 1st acts in moving into the WH was to return the bust of Churchill back to Britain.

      Suggesting that Obama and Netanyahu are becoming sensitive to each others’ concerns is like Obama becoming sensitive to Arizonian concerns.

      Indyk notes that the relationship between Obama and Netanyahu has been poisoned and filled with mistrust, yet suggests the two are working on that. What Indyk fails to note that it is Obama who did all the poisoning and Netanyahu has no reason to trust Obama, unless Obama starts making promises and honoring his word.

      Indyk says:

      The Palestinian Authority’s policing of the West Bank territory under its control to prevent violent attacks on Israelis begins to demonstrate that there is a responsible Palestinian partner.

      Since when have the Palestinians kept their word, shown any inclination to back off their intransigent demands or give any sign whatsoever that they are about to abandon their Jew/Israel hatred, by even a smidge?

      There is much more in Indyk’s article that is well expressed bull, generously sprayed with the deodorant of his own personal hopes, maybe’s and baseless optimistic guesses.

      The only thing that could ring true in Indyk’s piece is that Obama might succeed in moving Israel that much closer to negotiating an ultimate 2 state solution peace deal, but it won’t be through mutual respect and sensitivity, of which Obama has none for Netanyahu, but rather Obama using all the leverage he can muster to twist Netanyahu’s arm just about out of the socket to get him to submit.

      Its mind boggling that Indyk is still turned to for assessment and advice on the Israel v. Palestinian/Arab ongoing low grad war and Obama role in all this.

    13. yamit82 says:

      Indyk is as naive as he is doubtlessly brilliant.

      I couldn’t bring myself to read further!!!!!

      This Kapo Jew hating SOB is neither naive and certainly not brilliant.

      That said, what does it say about you, who think him naive and brilliant?

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