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  • January 9, 2013

    Poll: Most Israelis Don’t Believe Peace is Possible

    Peace Index poll indicates most Israelis believe that it will be impossible to achieve peace no matter who wins the election.

    By Elad Benari, Arutz Sheva

    Most Israelis believe that it will be impossible to achieve peace with the Palestinian Authority in the foreseeable future – no matter who wins the election on January 22.

    According to the latest poll by the Peace Index, some 67% of Israeli Jews agree with the assertion that no matter which parties prevail in the elections, the peace process with the PA will remain at a standstill for reasons not connected to Israel, and there is no chance of progress in the foreseeable future.


    The poll, conducted between December 31 and January 2, found that almost two-thirds of respondents (64%) see the likelihood of a Netanyahu-led government renewing the negotiations with the Palestinian Authority as moderately low or very low. About half of the Jewish public affirms that Israel should follow the policy of the present government even at the cost of a confrontation with the U.S. administration.

    As well, the poll found that 55% of Israel’s Jews define themselves as right-wing, while 21% define themselves as center and 17% as left. The same holds true for voting intentions: about 50% of Jewish respondents report that they intend to vote for secular right-wing and religious right-wing parties, and 30% for parties of the center and the left, while the rest of the respondents have not yet decided or did not respond.

    On the question of who is best suited to deal with political-security issues, 53% chose Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu, with two other figures with a pronounced nationalist profile considerably behind him. Former Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman was backed by 28% of respondents and Bayit Yehudi (Jewish Home) chairman Naftali Bennett was backed by 25%.

    Only 19% see Hatnua chairwoman Tzipi Livni, who presents herself as an expert on these types of issues, as suited to deal with them, and even Kadima chairman Shaul Mofaz, at 21%, did better than her in this area. Only 14% view Labor chairwoman Shelly Yechimovich as qualified to deal with political-security issues, and even fewer – 8% – consider Yesh Atid (Future) head Yair Lapid to be qualified.

    The poll also found that a much larger majority than the majority that opposes conceding eastern Jerusalem to the PA if there is a peace agreement opposes returning the Golan Heights to the Syrians even if there is a peace agreement that includes appropriate security arrangements (84%).

    Several polls conducted recently have found that there is a strong rejection among Israelis to conceding lands to Arabs or to establishing a Palestinian state.

    A poll last week found that about 83 percent of Israelis believe that pulling back to the indefensible pre-1967 borders will not bring an end to the Arab-Israeli conflict nor bring a peace accord with the Palestinian Authority.

    The poll, which was conducted by Dr. Mina Tzemach on behalf of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, also measured the willingness of those polled to change who they vote for, if they found out that their party would be ready to cede east Jerusalem and the Old City in a peace deal. The majority, 69% among the general public and 78% among Jews only, said they would change their vote if their party was willing to relinquish land and Israeli sovereignty over east Jerusalem.

    A second poll released last week shows that, for the first time, a plurality of Israelis now oppose the “two-state solution.”

    The poll, by the highly respected Geocartographia organization, found that 45% of Israelis are against the idea of setting up a PA state in Judea and Samaria. Forty percent said they support it, and 14% did not respond to the question.

    A poll taken in December found that only 28.2% of Israelis believe that Israel has a partner for peace in negotiations with the PA. 62.4% say there is no partner for peace.

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  • Posted by Ted Belman @ 8:25 am | 8 Comments »

    8 Comments to Poll: Most Israelis Don’t Believe Peace is Possible

    1. Batya says:

      exactly what I wrote here
      Here’s another
      Please read, comment and share, thanks

    2. Canadian Otter says:

      It’s no longer about “peace”. The plan now is Disengagement – based on facts on the ground.

      The arguments in favor of partition are basically two:

      1) Annexation would imply giving automatic citizenship to a huge number of Arabs (the numbers keep getting inflated) which would threaten “the Jewish character of Israel”. Alternatives to citizenship would be unthinkable.

      2) The international community demands an end to occupation. Otherwise business will suffer, along with more boycotts and another Intifada. But no satisfactory response is ever given to the certainty of terror from a future independent Palestine, what that would do to security, business, the use of ground and air transport.

      The main suspects no longer try to use the ruse of “peace” to deprive Jews of their land. The idea is so discredited that it just doesn’t sell anymore. That’s why Ehud Barak openly proposed DISENGAGEMENT from everything but the major settlements, and his idea was soon supported by Avigdor Lieberman.

      Even the very popular Naftali Bennett is for annexation of Area C – sometime, sort of, when it’s possible, if circumstances are right. But definitely DISENGAGE from Areas A and B.

    3. yamit82 says:

      “They have healed also the hurt of My people lightly, saying: ‘Peace, peace’, when there is no peace.”
      Otzma LeYisrael 2013


      A New Definition of ‘Peace’


      “Frankly, I’m a bit tired of the word.”

      “..in order for nations to exist, those nations must fight for their right to exist. Nations must insist upon their own borders, their own laws, their own values, and they must work for the betterment of their own population. There are always challenges to a nation’s sovereignty, and I don’t think there was ever a time when any nation has existed for even a moment without some challenge from inside or outside their borders. A nation cannot hope to have “peace” unless the nation ceases to exist.”

      “To exist, people and nations must fight to survive. If we fail, we die – and only in death do we have “peace.””

      Unlike other people, the Jewish raison d’être is to be different and should not be defined as Peace. After two millennia of waiting and working to re-establish the Jewish state, to see it overrun by Muslims is bizarre.

    4. NormanF says:

      Canadian Otter Said:

      It’s no longer about “peace”. The plan now is Disengagement – based on facts on the ground.
      The arguments in favor of partition are basically two:
      1) Annexation would imply giving automatic citizenship to a huge number of Arabs (the numbers keep getting inflated) which would threaten “the Jewish character of Israel”. Alternatives to citizenship would be unthinkable.
      2) The international community demands an end to occupation. Otherwise business will suffer, along with more boycotts and another Intifada. But no satisfactory response is ever given to the certainty of terror from a future independent Palestine, what that would do to security, business, the use of ground and air transport.
      The main suspects no longer try to use the ruse of “peace” to deprive Jews of their land. The idea is so discredited that it just doesn’t sell anymore. That’s why Ehud Barak openly proposed DISENGAGEMENT from everything but the major settlements, and his idea was soon supported by Avigdor Lieberman.
      Even the very popular Naftali Bennett is for annexation of Area C – sometime, sort of, when it’s possible, if circumstances are right. But definitely DISENGAGE from Areas A and B.

      People on here keep presenting all or nothing choices. The area in question has to become a commonwealth. This is the solution the Americans designed for Puerto Rico. Its worked well for over half a century. Israel should retain overriding sovereignty but allow the local population to run their own affairs. This means full Israeli sovereignty over Judea and Samaria. The Arabs can be statutory Israeli citizens if they want but they will not be formally incorporated into Israel. Nature abhors a vacuum. It doesn’t have be full incorporation or a Hamastan. The “Goldilocks” solution is just “right”, neither endangers Israel as a Jewish State nor blocks Arab aspirations. That can be implemented with or without Arab consent and in the long run they will adjust to it once they know destroying Israel is out of reach for them.

    5. Canadian Otter says:

      @ NormanF:
      The main concern should be annexation. The issue of citizenship – although very important – is secondary to extending sovereignty over ALL of Yesha first. Israelis don’t have to decide about the status of the Arabs now. ~~~~~ Those against annexation use the demographic threat to psychologically manipulate the population through division and confusion in order to keep the discussion going until it’s too late. Time is running out. Just look at how much the PA has gained in the past four years. They may be broke and dysfunctional, but who cares. They are regarded as the future State of Palestine by all countries, even by the Israeli “right wing” government. ~~~~~ The status of Yesha Arabs should be left for careful and protracted study – after annexation. Although there is no need to reach consensus in this regard, your suggestion and other alternatives to citizenship should be presented to the public now in order to demolish the leftist myth that automatic citizenship is the only option. But the main effort should be to create a national push for immediate and full annexation.

      Perhaps Israpundit could serve as a think tank to focus on how to get from here to annexation, how to get beyond discussion and into ORGANIZATION, how to create an effective national movement that will make the government listen to the people for a change – no matter who is in power. ~~~~~ A few strong demonstrations reduced the flow of infiltrators to only a trickle. They can work.

    6. yamit82 says:

      I have a feeling that events will overtake us and pave the way for annexation but not by planning or through our own efforts.

      As soon as Assad falls Obama will press Israel into giving up the Golan as a confidence gesture to the new Syrian regime.

      I have long speculated that once Iran gets the bomb Obama will push for a trade off-Iran’s Nukes for ours. I still believe this scenario or some semblance is behind much of the upheaval in the ME. The second is to deny the Chinese from the worlds richest energy resource.@ Canadian Otter:
      @ NormanF:

    7. Shmuel HaLevi says:

      Simply put. Mr. Netanyahu supported “disengagement No. 1, and he intends to do it again including from Jerusalem. By performing his specially developed talent to deceive and entrap, he tried to snare “kadima’s” carcass and as that carcass disintegrated, opted in Beitenu.
      Blatant blackmail at play against Mr. Liberman assures don Netanyahu that the to be short lived “union” endures “election”.
      After that… millions of dollars will play all hands.

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