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  • March 29, 2013

    The Strategic Impact of Israel’s Export of Natural Gas

    by David Wurmser, inFocus Quarterly

    The Sedco Express drilling rig above the Tamar gas field in the Mediterranean.

    In January 17, 2009, a team led by the Texas firm, Noble Energy Inc., discovered methane in a field (Tamar) now estimated to contain 275 billion cubic meters (9.7 trillion cubic feet) of natural gas—about half of what Europe consumes annually. A year later, the same team announced the discovery of monster gas field to the west of Tamar (Leviathan), which alone contains about as much gas as Europe consumes annually. There have been several other finds of smaller, but nevertheless substantial fields. In neighboring Cyprus, another field (Aphrodite) comparable to Tamar was discovered by Noble Energy, abutting and even slightly spilling into Israel’s waters. In short, Israel and its neighbor now sit atop roughly two years’ worth of European consumption.


    The Geostrategic Impact of Gas Supply

    Israel’s newfound energy abundance will dramatically affect its economy and resource realities, representing a major strategic change. The amount of gas discovered exceeds projected Israeli demand for at least a half century. As such, Israel will become a net exporter of gas.

    While the currently known amount of commercially producible hydrocarbons does not itself make Israel an energy super-major or strategic powerhouse, Israel may have an opportunity to leverage its supply of marginally critical amounts of gas to either Europe or Asia. Unlike oil, gas neither flows to spot markets nor is sold en route to a consumer. There is no global market price like Brent Sweet Crude for oil. Gas is priced unique to each deal, nation or region. It is not globally traded as a commodity. The infrastructure to transmit gas—either via pipelines or liquefaction—is so complex, demanding, and expensive that marketing agreements and supply patterns are locked in for the long term, indeed years before the molecules even flow. Even liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipped from port to port is essentially a “locked” structure much like train lines.

    The countries supplying and receiving the gas, therefore, tether their critical energy policies to the expectation of a particular supply chain, and to a particular diplomatic relationship. Since the severing of a particular source of gas is not easily replaced in an ad hoc fashion by oversupply from elsewhere, it is strategically important for a nation, even when it only represents a relatively small portion of its overall supply. Thus, even modest amounts of Israeli gas exports can carry significant strategic leverage.

    The short-term inflexibility of gas trade and the difficulty of replacing disrupted supply also imply that energy prices for consumers and revenues for suppliers can be easily manipulated by marginal increases or decreases. This price sensitivity makes the question of gas supply strategically vulnerable to the geopolitical interests and machinations of third parties. Two factors—the strategic context of gas transmission structures and third-party strategic ambitions—are often as important to understanding the overall strategic significance of a specific gas supply relationship as the two dimensional question of supply and consumption for the two nations involved in the trade themselves.

    Exporting to Europe

    There are five existing or proposed pipelines supplying gas to Europe from north Africa: the Trans-med pipeline (carrying 30.2 bcm/yr via Tunisia and Sicily), the Maghreb-Europe Gas Pipeline (carrying 12 bcm/yr via Gibraltar), the Medgaz pipeline (from Algeria to Almeria, Spain carrying 8 bcm, but only now about to come on-line), Greenstream (through Western Libya to Sicily had carried 11 bcm/yr but is now cut off), and finally the GALSI pipeline (which is still being planned and will run under the Mediterranean from far-eastern Algeria).

    All these pipeline structures originate in the Hassi al-Riml field in Algeria. In short, three pipelines carrying almost 50 bcm/yr into Europe all originate at one point. Moreover, while the EU sought to diversify its supply of gas by building the Trans-Saharan pipeline, which would carry Nigerian gas north, even that pipe passes through to Hassi al-Riml, where it hooks up with the other three currently operating pipelines.

    This makes roughly 18 percent of Europe’s gas supply extremely vulnerable. European experts—especially those energy companies along the southern littoral—are currently rethinking their dependence and diversification strategy. Europe’s grim reality could represent a unique window of opportunity for Israel to nail down long-term agreements and align export policy with a broader effort to reset Israeli-European relations.

    The Lure of Asia

    Despite the strategic benefit Europe represents, Asia may yet emerge as Israel’s preferred export destination. While the prices the Leviathan partners could demand by trading to Asia are higher, price is only partially the reason Asia will likely emerge as the most attractive export destination.

    Any Israeli gas trade with Europe would implicitly impact Russia’s domination of Europe’s gas supply. Not only would Israeli gas offer a backstop to any Russian threat to cut off supply as blackmail, but also a marginal addition of Israeli supply can create oversupply. Even light oversupply can cause prices to drop sharply in the European region—which whittles down the bottom line of Russian gas companies integrally linked to Russia’s ruling elite. In short, unless Russia manages to gain controlling interests in Israel’s gas sector, Russia will fear Israeli exports will tread on its sacred interests—a strategic challenge which Moscow will answer in ways which could give both Israel and Europe pause before proceeding.

    Additionally, Europe may be vulnerable, but its current demand is largely met. Asia, on the other hand, has major gaps approaching between its anticipated demand and supply. While Europe may eventually realize its vulnerability can be addressed by buying Israeli gas, Asia already realizes it. That explains why the two most serious contenders to attempt or successfully buy into Leviathan have been Asian companies (CNOOC and Woodside).

    Finally, the Leviathan partners have signed an initial agreement with the Australian firm, Woodside, to acquire about a third of the rights to the field in order to tap into its liquefaction experience, marketing structure, and capital. But Woodside is oriented toward marketing gas in Asia, and has structured the initial agreement to a schedule for building a liquefaction plant generally assumed to service trade to Asia. In short, the shape of the partnership will have a significant impact on whether the gas flows east or west.

    While the export destination of Israel’s gas is strategically important, the context and geostrategic circumstances of how gas might be transmitted to either Europe or Asia must first be examined, since these latter factors may dictate the shape of the former.

    Export Transmission Structures via Cyprus

    Early discussions after Leviathan’s discovery focused on building a pipeline from Israeli fields, through Cyprus, to Greece. But the tide has shifted in the last two years. Tensions over Cyprus, the growing role Gazprom and Russia appear to be playing there, and the overall instability and potential corruption which appears to be plaguing Cypriot politics and business, reminded many how problematic it can be to place critical infrastructure there.

    Moreover, the attractiveness of Cyprus diminished within the context of change in Egypt and the entry of Woodside as an equal partner in the Leviathan field. Any eastward-directed export infrastructure anchored to Cyprus would tend to rely on the Suez Canal, in essence locking what will emerge as Israel’s most vital industry into a trade route that passes through an Egypt politically dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood, which remains ideologically opposed to provisions in the 1979 peace treaty allowing Israeli passage through the Canal.

    Finally, although Cyprus has enjoyed a record of stability since the mid-1970s, several key trends indicate that instability will likely rise on Cyprus:

    Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan’s desire to reestablish a neo-Ottoman imperial empire under a rehabilitated “Caliphate” has driven Turkey to regard the Greek islands, the Balkans, and Cyprus to the north, as well as Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, and Israel to the south as “lost territories.”

    While never having surrendered its claims in Cyprus, Turkey’s attempt to enter the European state system has been linked to the island’s apparent stability since the mid-1970s. The more Turkey reorients and aspires to assert its Middle Eastern and Islamic credentials, the more its claims in Cyprus assume importance and intensity.

    The Turkish Dilemma

    Most recently, the Levant Basin Energy Report posited the idea that Israel could build an export pipeline from the Leviathan field to Turkey, and from Turkey to Europe. At the end of January 2013, Director General of Israel’s Ministry of Energy and Water Resources Shaul Tzemach indicated that Turkey could be an anchor customer for Israeli gas, and that the option of gas exports to Turkey was practical, despite the current reigning political tensions. As reported in Globes, Tzemach said of cooperating with Turkey,

      “There are quite a few geopolitical barriers, but if we know how to create the right conditions, it is possible. Gas should be used as a stabilizing factor which leads to cooperation between countries and includes multinationals and international parties with an interest in regional stability.”

    Officials from Turkey, however, appear less eager. Almost the same day Tzemach was quoted, Turkey’s Deputy Energy Minister told the Turkish daily Hurriyet that even if Israel 1) fulfilled Turkish demands for an open apology for the Mavi Marmara incident, 2) compensated families of the victims and 3) ended the blockade on Gaza—all dubious in and of themselves—Israel’s resource cooperation with Greek Cyprus would preclude any energy cooperation with Turkey.

    And even if such a pipeline were built, it would be subject to:

      Geopolitical blackmail on Ankara’s part.

      Sabotage: Pipelines to Turkey are bombed regularly. Indeed, it is precisely the tenuousness of pipeline supply to Turkey that led to the Turkish government’s interest in the Israeli pipeline, which it will be no more able to secure than its other pipelines.

      Geostrategic opposition from Moscow: Israeli gas poses a competitive pressure on Russia’s supply to the Turkish and European markets. It may be possible (but unlikely) to address this specific concern by bringing Gazprom into the deal in a controlling position, but bringing in Gazprom would only multiply the geopolitical vulnerability to blackmail and expose the pipeline system to Turkish-Russian and Russian-Israeli vagaries in addition to those between Turkey and Israel.

    But perhaps even more important than the mercantile problem this poses to Russia, Moscow now sees itself threatened by the rise of a resurgent Ottoman Sunni empire to its south and is seeking every way possible to cut Ankara’s ambitions to size. Being on the wrong side of Russia and Iran on the issue of a facility or structure in Turkey that cannot effectively be protected from terror is a risky endeavor. And both Tehran and Moscow would be tempted towards sabotage.

    The Jordanian Option

    Some in the Israeli government and political spectrum view the anchoring of an export structure to a liquefaction terminal in Aqaba on the Red Sea as an important strategic objective. Moreover, there is a powerful constituency, reinforced by international diplomatic preferences, to advance the option of lashing Israel and Jordan tightly through natural gas structures as a way to advance the stalled peace process.

    Still, it is highly unlikely that this option will ultimately prevail. Israel’s recent experience with Egypt, where half of Israel’s natural gas supply was permanently severed because of the destruction of the Egyptian-Israeli gas pipeline following the collapse of the Mubarak regime, suggests Israel will view with apprehension any scheme to anchor its critical infrastructure and an emerging major portion of its GDP to a potentially unstable Jordanian regime.

    Even assuming the Jordanian government does survive, political conflict in the Middle East in the age of the “Arab Spring” is increasingly expressing itself through attacks on energy infrastructure, particularly pipelines. Since Iran, Syria, and Hezbollah already have defined Israel’s gas industry as a strategic target, Israel’s government expects them to attempt to strike Israel’s export structure at any point of vulnerability. Moreover, Iran and Turkey—which have had some role in attacks on each others’ pipelines in Iraq, Syria, and Turkey—both view the successful emergence of Aqaba as a major energy transfer hub with tremendous strategic apprehension. In order to vie for control and undermine the viability of an emerging Kurdish state, both want all northern Iraqi gas and oil to either remain undeveloped or flow through their respective territories and are likely to sabotage any alternative, such as Aqaba. Israel’s Defense Forces (IDF) and the broader security establishment will almost certainly adopt the view that they cannot guarantee the protection of this critical infrastructure—which they are tasked to do—unless it is accompanied by the IDF’s direct presence.

    Liquefying the Gas at Home

    It is likely that the gas will be liquefied on Israeli territory and exported from there. Indeed, not only did the Tzemach Committee—tasked by the Israeli government to recommend overall natural gas policy, which the government may enact as law—expressed a “strong preference” for any export facility to be located on Israeli territory. Globes reported that officials from Israel’s Ministry of Energy and Water Resources have said the terminal would be built in Israel despite the bureaucratic difficulties, since “no sensible government is prepared to have its gas export installations in another country, however friendly it may be.”

    Israel’s government may also seek to leverage and align gas export policy to broader foreign policy objectives by favoring a flexible export strategy that exploits the country’s geographic position to service both Asia and Europe, allowing it to contemplate a dual-continent approach. Such a plan could potentially involve the construction of LNG terminals anchored at either end to the Eilat-Ashqelon Pipeline Corp. (EAPC) structure, depending on the volumes of resource discovered in the Levant Basin.

    Indeed, many Israeli officials view the importance of gas export in the context of Egypt’s deterioration—not only in terms of hostility to Israel, but in terms of anti-Western tendencies and chaos, all of which raise questions about the viability of the Suez Canal as a major European-Asian transit route. These officials see a cross-Israel natural gas pipeline as an additional anchor for transforming Israel into a major trans-ocean passageway connecting the Mediterranean and Red Seas. This would reassert Israel as a major trade and transportation route as an alternative to the Suez, and by developing the Eilat area and by extension, as Europe’s portal to Asia. The result would be to enhance Israel’s strategic value to the West.

    David Wurmser is the founder of the Delphi Global Analysis Group.

    Posted by Ted Belman @ 3:58 pm | 40 Comments »
  • 40 Comments to The Strategic Impact of Israel’s Export of Natural Gas

    1. Bert says:

      The discussion over oil and gas totally ignores the looming environmental crises due to the dramatic rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide and, more recently, methane which is a far more potent greenhouse gas even than CO2. Denial and ridicule will not affect mother nature or the consequences of what we are doing.
      The best energy solution is the one that is being totally suppressed. We need energy sources that are totally clean, safe, inexhaustible, universally available and which can totally replace oil, coal, natural gas and even nuclear. That solution would also demolish the ‘Arab Oil Weapon’ and weaken Russia as well.
      Highly advanced energy breakthroughs have existed for decades but remain suppressed, ignored and overlooked because of the domination of special interests. Naturally I approached both U.S. and Israeli officials with documented references. The usual response was dead silence. People were unwilling to even study some documents with an open mind even though there is no cost and no risk. I made the mistake of previously listing a reference energy website on Israpundit. One reader attacked me because there were some technical terms that he could not understand and so he dismissed the entire document and belittled me.
      If anyone is really interested in understanding this critical issue they will have to do all the research work themselves.

    2. Eric R. says:

      Bert Said:

      The discussion over oil and gas totally ignores the looming environmental crises due to the dramatic rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide and, more recently, methane which is a far more potent greenhouse gas even than CO2. Denial and ridicule will not affect mother nature or the consequences of what we are doing.

      I wish you would speak out of your mouth, rather than out of another orifice in your body. Greenhouse gas emissions (for those who believe this AGW crap, I proudly admit that I don’t) have gone DOWN in the USA over the last 15 years precisely because of the increased use of natural gas.

      It just shows you what Luddite, Marxist, human hating fanatics the environmentalists are. Two technologies that could greatly reduce greenhouse gases – nuclear and fracking – they are violently opposed to.

      These radical environmental people are not pro-earth; they are Marxist, anti-capitalist, anti-American, anti-humanity, and usually anti-Semitic as well.

    3. Eric R. says:

      “Indeed, many Israeli officials view the importance of gas export in the context of Egypt’s deterioration—not only in terms of hostility to Israel, but in terms of anti-Western tendencies and chaos, all of which raise questions about the viability of the Suez Canal as a major European-Asian transit route. These officials see a cross-Israel natural gas pipeline as an additional anchor for transforming Israel into a major trans-ocean passageway connecting the Mediterranean and Red Seas. This would reassert Israel as a major trade and transportation route as an alternative to the Suez, and by developing the Eilat area and by extension, as Europe’s portal to Asia. The result would be to enhance Israel’s strategic value to the West”.

      This is why the Israelis are building (with Chinese, not American, help)a railway from Ashdod to Eilat – to allow freight to bypass the Suez Canal. However, Israel will have to upgrade the port of Eilat to handle the anticipated additional capacity.

      There is another option for the gas use that is presently being considered – the EuroAsia interconnector. The gas would be used to drive electrical power in Israel, which would then be transmitted via a submarine cable on to Cyprus, then on to Crete, then to connect to the European power grid. The proposed cable is 2,000 MW; if Israel can export 1,500 MW every hour at say $0.10/kWh, that would bring in $150,000/hour, or about US$1.3 billion/year + it would greatly leverage Israeli influence over Cyprus, Greece and maybe some of the Balkan States.

    4. yamit82 says:

      Our gas finds if not preserved will enrich some few but put Israel back were she was as energy dependent in 15 years. Israel should not sell here long term energy independence for short term monetary gain. Energy independence translates into a lot of political and diplomatic independence and flexibility. Eric R. Said:

      These radical environmental people are not pro-earth; they are Marxist, anti-capitalist, anti-American, anti-humanity, and usually anti-Semitic as well.

      Expert: Now 8 ‘source zones’ of oil & gas could be feeding area underneath giant sinkhole (VIDEO)

      Bayou Corne: “Get Out Now!”

      Texas, where fracking wells are placed right next to homes, has now begun experiencing earthquakes.
      The latest was Sunday, March 10 in Cresson. You can find information on it here.
      The area is also experiencing gas leaks from the fracking sites.
      Earthquakes and sinkholes are only one part of the dangers of fracking which also include poisoned grass for milk and beef cattle and poisoned and burning drinking water for people in fracking areas. The very food you eat is being poisoned.

      Meanwhile, back in Lousiana, residents of Bayou Corne are being sternly warned to get out of the area quickly. The sinkhole is growing steadily.
      The gas pressure under the area is in danger of exploding.
      The land and the homes are worthless now. These people have lost everything.
      More information here .

      Concerns now are that the sinkhole will double and take out Route 70.
      Bobby Jindal came out from under his rock to meet with people in the area for the very first time. Residents were not surprised that he kept dodging the situation.
      Presidential candidate? Ha! Not even for garbage inspector.

      If lobbying and corporate campaign funding were outlawed in the US perhaps politicians would not have so much incentive to do their masters bidding and dirty work.

      No where in the world has a brine cavern collapsed to the extent of Bayou Corne. This is huge and ongoing. Yet, the plain cause is ignored and obfuscated by politics and corporations. It is a national disgrace.

    5. drjb says:

      Strategic significance???? ZERO!!
      I am so tired of the wet dreams of all those who spend countless hours calculating the billions and billions that Israel will reap from its new found energy resources. I am in the camp of those who are praying that something, anything, comes out of these gas fields. Which so far, it has not!
      Israel needs to build pipelines from the gas rigs to Israel, which it hasn’t, has to build storage plants in Israel for the gas, which it hasn’t, has to satisfy its own energy demands, which it hasn’t, has to convert most of its infrastructure to gas consuming forms, which it hasn’t, BEFORE it can dream of being an international player of geopolitical consequence.
      I know you all think that these gas field are a slam dunk, and I hope you are right, but please don’t assume this will be so. The road is still full of problems and people are counting their eggs before they’re hatched.
      If anybody wants to get some insight as to the difficulties involved in this process, please read or google Adira Energy, a company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange, which has a drilling license for some of those gas fields you guys dream about off the coast of Israel, and is going bankrupt!

    6. yamit82 says:

      @ Eric R.:

      Earthquakes and Fracking?

      One blog site says that debate over fracking is nothing more than a liberal tactic designed to hurt oil production. This is how ugly and ridiculous people get when it comes to defending their political party at the expense of good sense and the safety of a nation.
      Well, there is no one more liberal than President Obama and he is pro-fracking.

    7. Canadian Otter says:

      An ecosystem collapse seems to be happening right now, but the US govt & media are playing it down. Scientists are warning of an ecosystem collapse in both coasts of the United States. The latest crises have one thing in common: the rampant abuse of the environment in the name of industry and development. ~~~ A few samples: Seal pups are dying of starvation or some other disease by the thousands in the west coast – coincidentally in the same ocean where the Fukushima plant is still dumping huge amounts of radioactive debris. Radioactivity is absorbed along the food chain. ~~~~~ In the east coast dolphins are dying in large numbers. This comes on top of a sudden increase in the loss of manatees, an endangered species, in both coasts of Florida – along with huge losses of pelicans, turtles and other wild animals. ~~~ You may remember how after the oil spill massive amounts of toxic chemicals were dumped into the Gulf waters to dilute the oil. The less oil on the surface, the less the company was obligated to pay in compensation. ~~~~~ There is too much to post here, including the increased occurrence of sinkholes and earthquakes in areas of fracking, so please check this excellent website for details. Enenews updates daily on alarming events related to the nuclear and oil industries that other media are hiding from you. http://enenews.com/

    8. Eric R. says:

      Yamit:

      Wow! On the issue of the environment, you are gobbling up “information” from the same sources – leftist, Marxist, anti-Israel, anti-Semitic – whose information on anything else you would readily dismiss.

      Who knew that when it came to this issue, you were such a lefty?

      Texas and Oklahoma are not centers for fracking. That is mostly done in North Dakota (for oil) and Pennsylvania (for natural gas) and they are not suffering earthquake issues (if Pennsy had earthquakes, I’d certainly hear about it, being next door in New Jersey).

      You are correct about Obama – he wants fracking, but talks the politically correct game to keep the environmental leftists happy. The low cost of natural gas has helped to offset his diastrous fiscal policies.

    9. Eric R. says:

      For Canadian Otter and Yamit, who seem to be frothing leftists on this issue:

      The environmental movement has created the biggest genocide in human history, and it can be summed up in three letters – DDT. Its ban has condemned tens of millions of poor people, mostly in Africa, to death. Yet they won’t lift the ban. And they won’t let these people have GMO foods that could stop starvation.

      Not only are they anti-human, and genocidal, they are racist.

    10. rongrand says:

      @ Canadian Otter:

      G-d entrusted the earth to us and by darn we are doing a lousy job taking care of it.

      Listen we can do just about anything and and if we proceed with caution and good common sense the results can be gratifying without loss of life or property.

      Having said that, enter greed and you know the rest of the story.

    11. Canadian Otter says:

      @ Eric R.:
      I feel honored to be lumped in with my comrade Yamit, even when you use such wild characterization as “frothing leftists”.

      In fact, concern for the health of our environment and our quality of life should transcend politics of right and left.
      While the capitalistic West is guilty of all sorts of depredations, it’s been the Soviet and Chinese regimes – both regarded as “leftists” – that turned their territories into toxic moonscapes in only a few decades.
      Regarding GMOs, people of all political colors are waking up to their threat to health, agriculture and the environment. Scientific experiments feeding animals exclusively GMO foods literally kills them.
      Regarding DDT, it was wiping out birds. Life is a web. Whenever it is put out of balance, the whole biosphere suffers.
      While big shots in industry are laughing all the way to the bank, citizens are left to pay dearly for the damage they cause to our environment and our health. We should not be defending them.
      Recommended websites for Israpundit readers: The best is Enenews, with a link on my previous talkback. For news on GMOs see http://www.naturalnews.com/GMO.html

    12. Canadian Otter says:

      @ rongrand:
      Our planet is awesome, mysterious, beautiful, and generous to life, not an object for the reckless extraction of resources, the massive killing of animals, or a dumping place for toxic waste. It deserves our respect, at the very least.

      Here is an interesting article about the ocean: Could the Sea be Conscious? – http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2278137/Could-sea-conscious-Research-reveals-tiny-plankton-behave-like-marine-microbial-megamind.html

    13. rongrand says:

      @ Canadian Otter:

      Our planet is awesome, mysterious, beautiful, and generous to life,

      Now if we can only convince man to treat it with respect half the battle will be won.

      Just watch the characters who throw garbage out of car windows along side of the road, dump their ash trays in parking lots or wherever they are parked, too lazy to put them in the proper waste receptacle.

      Companies who dump waste in streams, thinking it will just go down stream and disappear. They should disappear.

      We tailgated many years at PennState football games and always took extra garbage bags for those parked nearby who didn’t have any with instructions to take the garbage home with them if they can’t fine an empty receptacle, its your garbage and you own it.

    14. Canadian Otter says:

      @ rongrand:
      PICTURES – http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2280916/Frozen-time-The-incredible-pictures-trees-encased-ice-violent-winter-storms-shores-Lake-Ontario.html

      You set a good example, Rongrand. That’s how people’s attitudes change, a little at the time. Children, in particular, are good observers and remember things people do to protect the environment.

    15. Canadian Otter says:

      PICTURES of sinkholes – Quite dramatic. Some may occur naturally. Others are definitely caused by man messing with the environment.

      http://countdowntozerotime.org/2013/03/02/americas-deadly-phenomenon-the-sinkholes-that-have-swallowed-homes-cars-and-businesses-across-the-country/

    16. yamit82 says:

      @ Canadian Otter:
      @ rongrand:

      Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks on Eco Judaism Roots

      Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks talks about the beginning of ecology within Judaism, when Adam is told to preserve the environment.

      Israel history and nature

    17. Canadian Otter says:

      @ yamit82:
      OUTSTANDING and important video on on Eco Judaism roots. Thank you, Yamit. It should be disseminated on the web.

      Greedy, selfish, and unscrupulous humans have completely distorted God’s message to be one where they can do whatever they want to the environment and to other creatures because they are the “masters”.

      Ironically, God also created microbes, perhaps to deflate Man’s self-importance. Just when humans feel entitled to murder billions of animals just because they can, a tiny invisible lifeform can defeat them – and there’s nothing they can do about it. Poetic justice.

    18. Eric R. says:

      Canadian Otter Said:

      Regarding DDT, it was wiping out birds. Life is a web.

      So, your “web of life” means savings birds, and letting tens of millions of “people of color” die, because you don’t even support limited use of DDT.

      Got it.

    19. Eric R. says:

      “We tailgated many years at PennState football games and always took extra garbage bags for those parked nearby who didn’t have any with instructions to take the garbage home with them if they can’t fine an empty receptacle, its your garbage and you own it.”

      We are not talking about litter. If we were, then Environmentalists would be praising the Tea Party and Evangelicals, who leave their rallies cleaner than when they arrived, while the supposed “environmentalists” at places like Occupy Wall Street, turned their encampments into feces and urine filled dumps that were orgies of rape (and of Jew-hatred).

      Why can’t you get it through your head that the so-called environmentalists are leftists who don’t give a sh*t about the environment? It is just a tool for the left to become dictatorial and run everybody’s life, all in the name of “saving the earth”? The other excuse for becoming ever more dictatorial is “It’s for the children”!

      Notice how all their answers involve more and more regulation, most of which is either designed to:

      a) Control people’s lives.
      b) Raise revenue to fund their Socialist schemes
      c) Weaken the West
      d) Protect their big business cronies who contribute to their campaigns, and in return create regulations that hinder startups that could someday challenge those big businesses? (That is basically the text book definition of fascism.)

    20. Eric R. says:

      @ yamit82:

      Rabbi Sacks proved to be a dhimmi who bowed to the leftists and Islamists at the BBC, and this is more evidence of it.

    21. yamit82 says:

      Israel is a wonder of the world as a paradise for migrating birds

      http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=migrating+birds+israel&oq=migrating+birds+israel&gs_l=youtube-reduced.3…499729.507239.0.508089.22.16.0.6.6.0.274.3292.1j0j15.16.0…0.0…1ac.1.o4Hub3CQ3lA@ Canadian Otter:
      @ rongrand:

    22. Canadian Otter says:

      @ Eric R.:
      It is unfortunate that the issue of race is being used here to defend the indefensible. When DDT wiped out the birds, this affected pollination. Birds eat fruit and distribute seeds around with their poop. That’s how the web of life works. Every species has a niche. They consume, they recycle, they serve as food for others, and in the case of birds and some pollinators like bees and wasps, they also help us grow food. Birds also eat some harmful insects, those that propagate disease. ~~~ DDT contains powerful toxins, which accumulate in the environment and along the food chain. The spraying ends up in waterways, planted fields, animals and people, including “colored people”.~~~ DDT has its origin in the Nazi biochemical stockpiles that became available to the US after the war. With a little tweaking they put them to use killing pests. A great money-making. And unused war planes were deployed spraying toxins in America.

    23. Honey Bee says:

      Eric R. Said:

      Texas and Oklahoma are not centers for fracking.

      @ yamit82:

      West Texas and Eastern NM have bee fracking for YEARS, long befuore it becane an issuse with the “eniromentalist”. I am alway amazed by people who know alot about nothing.

      As for eathquakes?, that was only me dancing at the Quihi Gun and Saddle Club. C’boy goes 270+ lbs and when lands on the heel of his boots it can cause sizemic desturbances

      Canadian Otter Said:

      An ecosystem collapse seems to be happening right now, but the US govt & media are playing it down. Scientists are warning of an ecosystem collapse in both coasts of the United States.

      Florida is collapsing linestone just like the Yucatan. Washinton’s lslands have been slinding into the ocean for 13,000 years.

    24. yamit82 says:

      @ Eric R.:
      @ Eric R.:

      DDT was banned I believe because it got into the water tables and when produce was not washed properly caused a lot of harmful damage in humans. It also killed inadvertently a lot of wildlife.

      Since you are a bleeding hart for those of color and I am assuming those whom we call the third world, then feed them out of your pocket and teach them to use substitutes that are safer than DDT.

      You are right I do care more for animal life than I do for your humans of color. You choose your pets and I will choose mine.

      I don’t relish the idea of being poisoned because some greedy SOB wants to make more money. I don’t like pseudo science, I don’t like untested chemical panaceas and that means testing of several generations. I believe I have the right to clean air and clean water more than I do any political rights. i want my food supply to be safe and not lead to serious problems later in life or transmitted to future generations.

      Monsanto has all the important patents on Modified genetic seeds and they use the government to protect their monopoly and forced marketing.

      Just like auto makers bury competitive systems and patents that would make cars cheaper, more efficient user friendly and safer. oil companies the same with alternative patents to oil fuel for cars etc.

      You don’t seem to have a problem with the merger of corporate and government interests as exists in America and Europe. Oh, that’s one of the definitions of fascism.

      PS you are right. I go out to good restaurants on occasion and I give nary a thought to the poor starving people of color anywhere and I assume just like you do.

      I don’t know what you are talking about. I posted the clip because of the message which is an accurate commentary on the Torah and Judaism not because I endorse Rabbi Sacks or don’t endorse him personally.

      You have an ideological political agenda here and I don’t.

    25. Honey Bee says:

      @ Canadian Otter:

      Don’t be a Canadian Goose!!!!!!!!!! DDT kills “squiters”, in Texas we have Yellow fever, Dengue fever,West Nile fever in our tropical areas along the Rio Grande. Judiciously applied DDT is a G-d send. Mexicans are still infected with Typhus [ a disease that nearly killled my Grand-mother in Poland]. I had West Nile, not fun.
      As for oil, Candians should talk, with all that oil shale that is dirty to extract. And selling it to the Chinese, really!! Another thing, keep your ill-legals out of Texas and taking jobs away from Texas roughnecks.
      Consider yourseles KILLER BEE STUNG AND MESS WITH TEXAS!!!!!!!!!

    26. Eric R. says:

      Canadian Otter Said:

      It is unfortunate that the issue of race is being used here to defend the indefensible.

      The left uses racism against us all the time, even when it is not an issue. Here is a policy that the left KNOWS kills millions of non-white people and still they do nothing to stop it.

      As Honey Bee points out, DDT, like other pesticides, CAN be used judiciously, and will save millions of lives. DDT was being sprayed aerially over wide areas when it was banned.

      I’ll tell you what is indefensible – it is IGNORING genocidal racism all for pursuing a leftist agenda under the guise of “saving the earth.”

      This whole global warming BS is being pushed above all else by the f**king UNITED NATIONS! That is ALL you need to know to realize this is bogus bulls**t.

    27. yamit82 says:

      My comment to Eric is in Moderation

    28. yamit82 says:

      As Honey Bee points out, DDT, like other pesticides, CAN be used judiciously, and will save millions of lives. DDT was being sprayed aerially over wide areas when it was banned.

      “DDT is no longer used or manufactured in most of the world, but because it does not break down readily, it is still one of the most commonly detected pesticides in the milk of nursing mothers. DDT is also one of the “dirty dozen” chemicals included in the 2001 Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The signatories to the “POPs Treaty” essentially agreed to ban all uses of DDT except as a last resort against disease-bearing mosquitoes. Unfortunately, however, DDT is still a routine option in 19 countries, most of them in Africa. (Only 11 of these countries have thus far signed the treaty.) Among the signatory countries, 31-slightly fewer than one-third-have given notice that they are reserving the right to use DDT against malaria. On the face of it, such use may seem unavoidable, but there are good reasons for thinking that progress against the disease is compatible with reductions in DDT use.

      Like other organochlorine pesticides, DDT bioaccumulates is fat soluble, so when an animal ingests it-by browsing contaminated vegetation, for example-the chemical tends to concentrate in its fat, instead of being excreted. When another animal eats that animal, it is likely to absorb the prey’s burden of DDT. This process leads to an increasing concentration of DDT in the higher links of the food chain. And since DDT has a high chronic toxicity-that is, long-term exposure is likely to cause various physiological abnormalities-this bioaccumulation has profound implications for both ecological and human health.

      Many African countries have used DDT for mosquito control in indoor spraying programs, but the primary use of DDT on the continent has been as an agricultural insecticide. Consequently, in parts of west Africa especially, DDT resistance is now widespread in A. gambiae. But even if A. gambiae were not resistant, a full-bore campaign to suppress it would probably accomplish little, because this mosquito is so efficient at transmitting malaria. Unlike most Anopheles species, A. gambiae specializes in human blood, so even a small population would keep the disease in circulation. One way to get a sense for this problem is to consider the “transmission index”-the threshold number of mosquito bites necessary to perpetuate the disease. In Africa, the index overall is 1 bite per person per month. That’s all that’s necessary to keep malaria in circulation. In India, by comparison, the TI is 10 bites per person per month.

      A group of French researchers recently announced some very encouraging results for a new anti-malarial drug known as G25. The drug was given to infected aotus monkeys, and it appears to have cleared the parasites from their systems. Although extensive testing will be necessary before it is known whether the drug can be safely given to people, these results have raised the hope of a cure for the disease. We now have half a century of evidence that routine use of DDT simply will not prevail against the mosquitoes. Most countries have already absorbed this lesson, and banned the chemical or relegated it to emergency only status. Now the RBM campaign and associated efforts are showing that the frequency and intensity of those emergencies can be reduced through systematic attention to the chronic aspects of the disease. There is less and less justification for DDT, and the futility of using it as a matter of routine is becoming increasingly apparent: in order to control a disease, why should we poison our soils, our waters, and ourselves?”

      http://www.worldwatch.org/node/517

    29. yamit82 says:

      Comment was blocked as spam

    30. yamit82 says:

      As Honey Bee points out, DDT, like other pesticides, CAN be used judiciously, and will save millions of lives. DDT was being sprayed aerially over wide areas when it was banned.

      “DDT is no longer used or manufactured in most of the world, because it does not break down readily, it is still one of the most commonly detected pesticides in the milk of nursing mothers. DDT is also one of the “dirty dozen” chemicals included in the 2001 Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The signatories to the “POPs Treaty” essentially agreed to ban all uses of DDT except as a last resort against disease-bearing mosquitoes. Unfortunately, however, DDT is still a routine option in 19 countries, most of them in Africa. (Only 11 of these countries have thus far signed the treaty.) Among the signatory countries, 31-slightly fewer than one-third-have given notice that they are reserving the right to use DDT against malaria. On the face of it, such use may seem unavoidable, but there are good reasons for thinking that progress against the disease is compatible with reductions in DDT use.

    31. yamit82 says:

      Like other organochlorine pesticides, DDT bioaccumulates is fat soluble, so when an animal ingests it-by browsing contaminated vegetation, for example-the chemical tends to concentrate in its fat, instead of being excreted. When another animal eats that animal, it is likely to absorb the prey’s burden of DDT. This process leads to an increasing concentration of DDT in the higher links of the food chain. And since DDT has a high chronic toxicity-that is, long-term exposure is likely to cause various physiological abnormalities-this bioaccumulation has profound implications for both ecological and human health.

      Many African countries have used DDT for mosquito control in indoor spraying programs, but the primary use of DDT on the continent has been as an agricultural insecticide. Consequently, in parts of west Africa especially, DDT resistance is now widespread in A. gambiae. But even if A. gambiae were not resistant, a full-bore campaign to suppress it would probably accomplish little, because this mosquito is so efficient at transmitting malaria. Unlike most Anopheles species, A. gambiae specializes in human blood, so even a small population would keep the disease in circulation. One way to get a sense for this problem is to consider the “transmission index”-the threshold number of mosquito bites necessary to perpetuate the disease. In Africa, the index overall is 1 bite per person per month. That’s all that’s necessary to keep malaria in circulation. In India, by comparison, the TI is 10 bites per person per month.

      A group of French researchers recently announced some very encouraging results for a new anti-malarial drug known as G25. The drug was given to infected aotus monkeys, and it appears to have cleared the parasites from their systems. Although extensive testing will be necessary before it is known whether the drug can be safely given to people, these results have raised the hope of a cure for the disease. We now have half a century of evidence that routine use of DDT simply will not prevail against the mosquitoes. Most countries have already absorbed this lesson, and banned the chemical or relegated it to emergency only status. Now the RBM campaign and associated efforts are showing that the frequency and intensity of those emergencies can be reduced through systematic attention to the chronic aspects of the disease. There is less and less justification for DDT, and the futility of using it as a matter of routine is becoming increasingly apparent: in order to control a disease, why should we poison our soils, our waters, and ourselves?”

      http://www.worldwatch.org/node/517

    32. yamit82 says:

      Like other organochlorine pesticides, DDT bioaccumulates is fat soluble, so when an animal ingests it-by browsing contaminated vegetation, for example-the chemical tends to concentrate in its fat, instead of being excreted. When another animal eats that animal, it is likely to absorb the prey’s burden of DDT. This process leads to an increasing concentration of DDT in the higher links of the food chain. And since DDT has a high chronic toxicity-that is, long-term exposure is likely to cause various physiological abnormalities-this bioaccumulation has profound implications for both ecological and human health.

    33. yamit82 says:

      “Many African countries have used DDT for mosquito control in indoor spraying programs, but the primary use of DDT on the continent has been as an agricultural insecticide. Consequently, in parts of west Africa especially, DDT resistance is now widespread in A. gambiae. But even if A. gambiae were not resistant, a full-bore campaign to suppress it would probably accomplish little, because this mosquito is so efficient at transmitting malaria. Unlike most Anopheles species, A. gambiae specializes in human blood, so even a small population would keep the disease in circulation. One way to get a sense for this problem is to consider the “transmission index”-the threshold number of mosquito bites necessary to perpetuate the disease. In Africa, the index overall is 1 bite per person per month. That’s all that’s necessary to keep malaria in circulation. In India, by comparison, the TI is 10 bites per person per month.”

    34. yamit82 says:

      A group of French researchers recently announced some very encouraging results for a new anti-malarial drug known as G25. The drug was given to infected aotus monkeys, and it appears to have cleared the parasites from their systems. Although extensive testing will be necessary before it is known whether the drug can be safely given to people, these results have raised the hope of a cure for the disease. We now have half a century of evidence that routine use of DDT simply will not prevail against the mosquitoes. Most countries have already absorbed this lesson, and banned the chemical or relegated it to emergency only status. Now the RBM campaign and associated efforts are showing that the frequency and intensity of those emergencies can be reduced through systematic attention to the chronic aspects of the disease. There is less and less justification for DDT, and the futility of using it as a matter of routine is becoming increasingly apparent: in order to control a disease, why should we poison our soils, our waters, and ourselves?”

      http://www.worldwatch.org/node/517

    35. yamit82 says:

      A group of French researchers recently announced some very encouraging results for a new anti-malarial drug known as G25. The drug was given to infected aotus monkeys, and it appears to have cleared the parasites from their systems. Although extensive testing will be necessary before it is known whether the drug can be safely given to people, these results have raised the hope of a cure for the disease. We now have half a century of evidence that routine use of DDT simply will not prevail against the mosquitoes. Most countries have already absorbed this lesson, and banned the chemical or relegated it to emergency only status. Now the RBM campaign and associated efforts are showing that the frequency and intensity of those emergencies can be reduced through systematic attention to the chronic aspects of the disease. There is less and less justification for DDT, and the futility of using it as a matter of routine is becoming increasingly apparent: in order to control a disease, why should we poison our soils, our waters, and ourselves?”

    36. yamit82 says:

      Honey Bee Said:

      West Texas and Eastern NM have bee fracking for YEARS, long befuore it becane an issuse with the “eniromentalist”. I am alway amazed by people who know alot about nothing.

      As for eathquakes?, that was only me dancing at the Quihi Gun and Saddle Club. C’boy goes 270+ lbs and when lands on the heel of his boots it can cause sizemic desturbances

      As I understand it the fracking in Texas and Oklahoma are relatively small scale and not as concentrated in specific areas as in other domains. While what you say may be true as to the long term geological activity in those named areas I submit the possibility of deterioration at an accelerated rates due to Fracking. The evidence so far seems to be mostly anecdotal, like methane gas in the water systems, sink holes, landslides and small earthquakes where in the past there were few or much fewer and less severe earthquakes all in areas where Fracking is now taking place. These reports should be studied and the disclaimers of vested interests should be viewed as biased and non objective.

      From what you say Cowboy is an asset. Rent him out.

    37. Honey Bee says:

      yamit82 Said:

      yamit82 Said:

      The evidence so far seems to be mostly anecdotal, like methane gas in the water systems, sink holes, landslides and small earthquakes

      There is fault line in western OK that goes about every 50 years and someday be shaking Kans. Burnin water has alway been a phenomenen in Texas. C’boys Dads well water was undrinkable. His Mom couldn’t keep a houseplant. The water in Midland, Ozona and Ft Stockton ,alsway have been undrinkable.
      Cenotes in Florida,southern Mexican and the Lousiane are cause by DETERIATING LIMESTOME from old sea beds. The Mayans used to through virgens into the cenotes in the yucan,C’boy say a waste of virgins.

      yamit82 Said:

      From what you say Cowboy is an asset. Rent him out

      There’s an idea,but then what DO I DO OF A COLD NIGHT.

    38. Honey Bee says:

      @ Eric R.:

      Better be careful or some trogelite will try to censor you for stating the truth in realistic terms!!!!!!!

    39. steven l says:

      IL will find the solutions to her potential problems! With or without the assistance of other countries.

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